B’nai Mitzvah

The origins of the Bat Mitzvah ceremony go back at least two thousand years. While the Bible offers no clear demarcation of the stage of life when one is expected to practice the obligations of Jewish adulthood, we know that by the first century C.E., those obligations were set at age thirteen for boys. At this age, a minor’s word was valid in a court of law. We read in the Talmud (Avot 5:21): “At age five a child is brought to the bible, at ten to the Mishnah, at age thirteen one becomes subject to the Commandments.”

In contemporary America, the Bar/Bat Mitzvah ceremony has become an important life cycle event. The Bar or Bat Mitzvah of a child is a joyous experience for the whole family. Often, relatives and friends will gather from near and far to participate in this significant event in the life of the Bar/Bat Mitzvah and the family. In acknowledgment of the achievement of the student, various honors distributed at any Shabbat morning service are given to significant family and friends of the Bat/Bar Mitzvah student.

The process of becoming a mature adult and a mature Jew is not an easy one, particularly in our time. Bar/Bat Mitzvah is a religious celebration of the potential for growth and commitment, as a child begins to undertake the responsibilities of adulthood. What makes the ceremony uniquely Jewish is that, after several years of study, the child can begin to frame those responsibilities in a Jewish context, aligning him or herself to a system of mitzvot, which demands an appreciation and adherence to ways of righteousness and decency.

A Bar/Bat Mitzvah is a time for great joy. The student has been challenged to take on a task larger than any other he or she has ever undertaken. By demonstrating competence and commitment to our Jewish heritage, the Bar/Bat Mitzvah can take his or her place as an adult partner in the Jewish community. A Bar/Bat Mitzvah begins this new stage of life by doing the most adult thing that a Jew can do. He or she is called to lead the congregation in prayer. The Bar/Bat Mitzvah ceremony gives honor to the Torah, the Jewish community, and to our maturing children, and as such has earned a special place in our tradition.

The customs and expectations of Congregation Beth Israel concerning the readiness of the student, the role of the family during the service and some suggestions for the celebration can be found in Bar/ Bat Mitzvah Guide. Specifically, we ask that both parents and the student sign a Letter of Agreement which delineates the minimum commitment.

Below are MP3’s of prayers chanted by Cantor Alisa Fineman to be utilized during Bar/Bat Mitzvah preparation.